Complementary

Two colors that are on opposite sides of the color wheel. This combination provides a high contrast and high impact color combination – together, these colors will appear brighter and more prominent.

Monochromatic

TThree shades, tones and tints of one base color. Provides a subtle and conservative color combination. This is a versatile color combination that is easy to apply to design projects for a harmonious look.

Pastel (softer colors with added whiteness)

Soft (produces darker pastel colors)

Light (very light, almost washed-out colors)

Hard (deeper, very saturated colors)

Pale (colors with more gray; less saturated)

Contrast

Contrast supplements the selected hue with its complement (the color opposite it on the color wheel) as another source color.

Pastel (softer colors with added whiteness)

Soft (produces darker pastel colors)

Light (very light, almost washed-out colors)

Hard (deeper, very saturated colors)

Pale (colors with more gray; less saturated)

Triadic

Three colors that are evenly spaced on the color wheel. This provides a high contrast color scheme, but less so than the complementary color combination — making it more versatile. This combination creates bold, vibrant color palettes.

Pastel (softer colors with added whiteness)

Soft (produces darker pastel colors)

Light (very light, almost washed-out colors)

Hard (deeper, very saturated colors)

Pale (colors with more gray; less saturated)

Tetradic

Four colors that are evenly spaced on the color wheel. Tetradic color schemes are bold and work best if you let one color be dominant, and use the others as accents. The more colors you have in your palette, the more difficult it is to balance.

Pastel (softer colors with added whiteness)

Soft (produces darker pastel colors)

Light (very light, almost washed-out colors)

Hard (deeper, very saturated colors)

Pale (colors with more gray; less saturated)

Analogous

Three colors that are side by side on the color wheel. This color combination is versatile, but can be overwhelming. To balance an analogous color scheme, choose one dominant color, and use the others as accents.

Pastel (softer colors with added whiteness)

Soft (produces darker pastel colors)

Light (very light, almost washed-out colors)

Hard (deeper, very saturated colors)

Pale (colors with more gray; less saturated)